Traditional Systems and Practices of Conflict Resolution

Abstract:

The International Center for Ethno-Religious Mediation’s Journal of Living Together is pleased to publish this collection of peer-reviewed articles on Traditional Systems and Practices of Conflict Resolution. Our hope is that these articles written by scholars from multidisciplinary fields of study will help to advance our understanding of major issues, theories, methods, and practices of conflict resolution. Mainstream research and studies on conflict resolution have until now relied in large measure on theories, principles, models, methods, processes, cases, practices and body of literature developed in western cultures and institutions. Little or no attention has been given to the systems and processes of conflict resolution that were historically utilized in ancient societies or are currently being practiced by traditional rulers and other indigenous leaders (i.e., kings, queens, chiefs, village heads, priests) in different parts of the world and at the grassroots level. ¬-These indigenous leaders work to mediate and resolve disputes, restore justice and harmony, and foster peaceful coexistence in their various constituencies, communities, regions and countries. Also, a thorough investigation of the syllabi and portfolios of courses in the field of conflict analysis and resolution, peace and conflict studies, alternative dispute resolution, conflict management studies, and related fields of study confirms widespread, but false, assumption that conflict resolution is a western creation. Although traditional systems and processes of conflict resolution predate modern theories and practices of conflict resolution, they are almost, if not completely, unavailable in our conflict resolution text books, course syllabi, and public policy discourse. Even with the establishment of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in 2000 – an international body mandated by the United Nations to raise awareness about and discuss indigenous issues – and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples which was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 2007 and ratified by member states, no significant discussion has been held at the international level on the traditional systems and processes of conflict resolution, and the various roles traditional rulers and indigenous leaders play in preventing, managing, mitigating, mediating or resolving conflicts and promoting a culture of peace both at the grassroots and national levels. The International Center for Ethno-Religious Mediation believes that a research and international discussion on traditional systems and processes of conflict resolution are highly needed at this crucial time in world history. Traditional rulers and indigenous leaders are the custodians of peace at the grassroots level, and for a long time, the international community has ignored them and their wealth of knowledge and wisdom in the areas of conflict resolution and peacebuilding. It is high time we included traditional rulers and indigenous leaders in the discussion on international peace and security. Together, we are working to add to our societies’ overall knowledge of conflict resolution, peacemaking and peacebuilding. By publishing this collection of articles on Traditional Systems and Practices of Conflict Resolution, we hope to initiate a pluri-disciplinary, scholarly, policy, legal and civic discussion on traditional systems and processes of conflict resolution.

Read or download full paper:

Ugorji, Basil (Ed.) (2019). Traditional Systems and Practices of Conflict Resolution

Journal of Living Together , 6 (1), 2019, ISSN: 2373-6615 (Print); 2373-6631 (Online).

@Article{Ugorji2019
Title = {Traditional Systems and Practices of Conflict Resolution }
Editor = {Basil Ugorji}
Url = {https://www.icermediation.org/traditional-systems-and-practices-of-conflict-resolution/}
ISSN = {2373-6615 (Print); 2373-6631 (Online)}
Year = {2019}
Date = {2019-12-18}
Issue Title = {Traditional Systems and Practices of Conflict Resolution}
Journal = {Journal of Living Together }
Volume = {6}
Number = {1}
Publisher = {International Center for Ethno-Religious Mediation}
Address = {Mount Vernon, New York }
Edition = {2019}.

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